Press Items
Cancer, Interrupted
Graduate students at the University of Kansas are uncovering new ways to more effectively treat cancer.  Elyse Petrunak and Charlie Fehl, graduate students in medicinal chemistry at KU, are researching a specific enzyme, cytochrome P450 17A1, or CYP17A1, and its role in treatment of prostate cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Read the full article...
Timer Warner: Segment on Prostate Cancer Drug Research in Scott and Aubé Labs
Cable television highlighted research in the Scott and Aubé labs looking to improve the prostate cancer drug abiraterone. Graduate students Charlie Fehl and Elyse Petrunak are working to design and test new compounds that will treat prostate cancer by halting production of steroid hormones like testosterone, while reducing undesirable side effects such as elevated blood pressure. Watch the video...
Hooked on Heme: Examining Enzymes and Cancer's Causes



Emily Scott's studies of cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in various types of cancers and in clearing foreign chemicals from the human body began with studies in starfish off the Gulf Coast. Read the full article...
Emily Scott: Enzyme Explorer
When she was an undergraduate studying marine biology at Texas A&M University at Galveston, Emily Scott received a late-night phone call from her professor. A bunk had become available on a research boat bound for oxygen-depleted “dead zones” in the Gulf of Mexico, but it was leaving the next day. Scott jumped at the chance. Despite battling seasickness as she took course exams on board the ship, Scott enjoyed her first taste of hands-on science. “I was hooked, and I went back every chance I got,” she says. Read the full article...
Follow Your Passion
Following receipt of the North American New Investigator Award in honor of James R. Gillette, a profile of Emily Scott's career appeared in the ISSX Newsletter. Read the full article...
SSRL Data Advances Prostate Cancer Drug Design

CYP17A1 is partially embedded in membranes, and the technical difficulties of forming it into crystals – the first step in determining its structure – had long frustrated scientists. Emily Scott and Natasha DeVore from the University of Kansas solved that problem by turning E. coli bacteria into efficient factories for making a slightly modified version of CYP17A1, and then stabilizing this protein to form the necessary crystals. They brought the crystals to SSRL, where they had been granted rapid access approval to use Beam Line 9-2 to solve the structure of CYP17A1 for the first time. Read the full article...
Prostate Cancer Target Analyzed
To understand better how two new anti- cancer agents work, researchers have obtained the first X-ray structures of a key cytochrome P450 enzyme to which they bind. Understanding how the drugs inhibit the enzyme could aid the design of more effective medications for prostate and breast cancer with fewer side effects. Read the full article...
ASPET Drug Metabolism Division Early Career Achievement Award
Following receipt of the 2011 Early Career Achievement Award, a brief profile of Dr. Scott's studies and award lecture was highlighted on the ASPET website. Read the full article...
Research highlight at Advanced Photon Source


The Annual Report of the Advanced Photo Source highlighted our research on cytochrome P450 2E1 structures that revealed very different active site topographies for complexes with low molecular weight compounds (yellow) and fatty acid analogs (purple). Read the full article...
Enzymes Key to Fighting Lung Cancer


Emily Scott, assistant professor of medicinal chemistry at the University of Kansas, was recently awarded a $300,000 grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for her innovative research in the fight against lung cancer. Watch the video...
Cover of Drug Metabolism and Disposition
A set of X-ray structures of cytochrome P450 2A6, 2A13, and a quadruple 2A6 mutant all with phenacetin make the cover of Drug Metabolism and Disposition. Read the full article...